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All films screen on a Tuesday evening at 8pm
Membership:
 • £5 per annum
Entrance fee:
  • £5 for members
  • £6 for guests
  • £4 concessionary
    (members only)

You can become a member at the door when you attend your first film. The membership application form is on our flyers, which will be available soon.

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Please note that the redesigned Thanet Film Society web site is still under construction at present and that the 'about us' and 'archive' pages will be added in the near future.

 

Showing next: Tuesday 23 September at 8pm
Calvary

director: John Michael McDonagh
starring: Brendan Gleeson, Chris O'Dowd, Kelly Reilly

Brendan Gleeson plays Father James, who is the local clergyman of a rural Irish parish. During confession one Sunday, an unseen local informs Father James of his plan to kill him as a way of gaining retrobution for abuse he suffered as a young boy at the hands of another Catholic priest. Left with only seven days to make his peace, James visits those within his community while trying to track down his potential killer. Through his exchanges with the locals, which include a cuckolded butcher (Chris O'Dowd), a wealthy businessman (Dylan Moran) and an atheistic doctor (Aidan Gillen), James realises that the institution to which he has dedicated his life is becoming obsolete, causing him to doubt the validity of his faith...

Winner of Best Film, Best Screenplay and Best Lead Actor (Film) at the 2014 Irish Film and Television Awards, the film also won the FIPRESCI Prize at the (honestly!) 2014 Transylvania International Film Festival.

"Gleeson’s magnificent intensity and the palpable wit and intelligence of the film’s conception make Calvary an audacious advance on The Guard. This is not only a provocatively involving thriller but a true rarity in cinema – a genuinely compelling moral and theological investigation." – Jonathan Romney – Sight and Sound

 

Why our films have to start promptly at 8pm
Although our films are scheduled to start at 8pm, on busier nights we've always been able to hold up the start until everyone is in and seated. With the arrival of digital projection, however, this has all changed. Most of the films we screen now arrive as high definition digital files that are coded to play at a specific time, over which the projectionist has no control. This means that the film has to start playing at 8pm or not at all. Thus to avoid potentially missing the start of the film, it's worth arriving in good time for the screening.